The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission

PRESS RELEASE
9-24-09

EEOC SUES BETTER FAMILY LIFE FOR PREGNANCY DISCRIMINATION

Community Development Organization Refused to Hire Pregnant Woman for Trainer Job, Federal Agency Charges

ST. LOUISBetter Family Life, Inc., a community development organization, violated federal law by rescinding a job offer to a woman because she was pregnant, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) charged today in a discrimination lawsuit filed today in federal court.

According to the EEOC’s suit, filed in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Missouri, Civil Action No. 09-cv-1595, in January 2009, a representative of Better Family Life telephoned Davis to ask her if she would be interested in the job of employment lead trainer, and Davis responded that she wanted the job. A meeting was set up for a week later for Davis to fill out hiring paperwork. Before the call ended, Davis told the representative that she was pregnant, the EEOC said. On the morning of the date of the meeting, Better Family Life left a voice-mail message for Davis, canceling the meeting and rescinding the job offer because she was pregnant.

Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended by the Pregnancy Discrimination Act, protects applicants and employees from discrimination based on pregnancy in hiring, termination and terms and conditions of employment. The EEOC filed suit after first attempting to reach a voluntary settlement.

“A family-oriented organization like Better Family Life should be particularly sensitive to the fact that pregnant women are capable of working and should be allowed to work,” said Barbara A. Seely, Regional Attorney of the St. Louis District. “The EEOC is committed to eliminating pregnancy discrimination in the workplace.”

Better Family Life, Inc. is a community development organization which, according to its web site, is “dedicated to the growth and prosperity of the American family.”

The EEOC enforces federal laws prohibiting employment discrimination. Further information about the EEOC is available on its web site at www.eeoc.gov.


This page was last modified on September 24, 2009.

Home Return to Home Page