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After You Have Filed a Charge

Checking the Status of Your Charge

To protect your privacy, we do not allow anyone to access charge information on the Internet. You can find out the specific status of your charge by calling the EEOC field office where your charge is filed. If you have your charge number, you can also get more general information about your status by calling EEOC toll-free at 1-800-669-4000 (TTY: 1-800-669-6820).

Adding to Your Charge

If new events take place after you file your charge that you believe are discriminatory, we can add these new events to your charge and investigate them. This is called “amending” a charge. In some cases, we may decide it is better for you to file a new charge of discrimination. If new events are added to your charge or a new charge is filed, we will send a copy of the new or amended charge to the employer and investigate the new events along with the rest. Keep in mind that the strict deadlines for filing a charge also apply when you want to amend a charge. The fact that you filed an earlier charge may not extend the deadline. For this reason, you should contact your investigator immediately if you think other discriminatory events have taken place.

Updating Your Contact Information

It is important that we know how to contact you while we are investigating your charge. You can update your contact information by calling the EEOC field office where your charge is filed. Or you can EEOC toll-free at 1-800-669-4000 (TTY: 1-800-669-6820), and we will send your contact information to the appropriate office.

Requesting a Notice of Right to Sue

You may request a Notice of Right To Sue by contacting the EEOC office handling your charge. You should submit the request in writing. 

If you filed your charge under Title VII (discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex and national origin), or under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) based on disability, you must have a Notice of Right To Sue from EEOC before you can file a lawsuit in federal court. Generally, you must allow EEOC 180 days to resolve your charge. Although, in some cases, EEOC may agree to issue a Notice of Right To Sue before the 180 days.

If you filed your charge under the Age Discrimination in Employment Act (discrimination based on age 40 and above), you do not need a Notice of Right to Sue from EEOC. You may file a lawsuit in federal court 60 days after your charge was filed with EEOC.

If you filed your charge under the Equal Pay Act (wage discrimination based on sex), you do not need a Notice of Right To Sue from EEOC. You may file a lawsuit in federal court within two years from the day you received the last discriminatory paycheck.