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Mavis Discount Tire to Pay $2.1 Million to Settle EEOC Class Sex Discrimination Lawsuit

Tire Retailer Violated Federal Law by Systemically Refusing to Hire Women in Its Field Locations, Federal Agency Charged

NEW YORK - Mavis Discount Tire, Inc. / Mavis Tire Supply Corp. / Mavis Tire NY, Inc. / Cole Muffler, Inc., a large tire retailer based in the New York metropolitan area, will pay $2.1 million and provide other relief to settle a class sex discrimination lawsuit by the U.S. Equal Employment Oppor­tunity Commission (EEOC), the agency announced today.

According to EEOC's lawsuit, Mavis engaged in a pattern or practice of sex discrimination by refusing to hire women for its field positions - managers, assistant managers, mechanics, and tire technicians - in the company's over 140 stores throughout Connecticut, Massachusetts, New York, and Pennsylvania. EEOC also charged that Mavis failed to make, keep, and preserve employment records.

Such alleged conduct violates Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. EEOC filed its lawsuit in U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York (Case No. 12-CV-00741) after first attempting to reach a pre-litigation settlement through its conciliation process.

The consent decree settling the suit, entered by Judge Katherine P. Failla on March 24, 2016, provides that Mavis will pay $2.1 million, to be divided among 46 aggrieved women. Also, the decree provides for extensive safeguards to prevent future discrimination by implementing hiring goals for women, a comprehensive recruitment and hiring protocol, and anti-discrimination policies and training. 

"We are pleased that as a result of this settlement, Mavis will be making concerted, verifiable efforts to hire more women at all of its field locations," EEOC Acting Regional Attorney Raechel Adams said.

EEOC New York District Director Kevin Berry added, "This case exemplifies EEOC's commitment to remedying systemic bias. EEOC found that Mavis for years had maintained a pattern of not hiring women at its field locations. This settlement ensures that qualified women will continue to be hired in the future - and advances EEOC's first priority in its Strategic Enforcement Plan, eliminating barriers in recruitment and hiring."

EEOC General Counsel David Lopez said, "We are pleased that during Women's History Month, we were able to announce this settlement, which is one in a series of EEOC cases nationally to address discriminatory barriers for women. Moving forward, qualified female applicants will be judged by their talents and skill and not simply passed over because of their gender - and women who were denied positions will be compensated."

The elimination of recruiting and hiring practices that discriminate against women, racial, ethnic and religious groups, older workers, and people with disabilities is one of six national priorities identified by EEOC's Strategic Enforcement Plan (SEP).

EEOC's New York District Office oversees New York, Connecticut, Maine, Vermont, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and parts of New Jersey. EEOC enforces federal laws prohibiting employment discrimination. Further information about the agency is available at its website at